What is psychology? If asked it can be thought to be the study of the human mind, an exploration of all that is possible and all that is impossible for a single human to accomplish. It can also be exploration of self, of self awareness and the infinite that is the thought process.

So what is psychology? It is not the ability to read the thoughts of others, to sense the underlying feelings of others and it is not the ability to talk someone out of any mental disorder. Rather it is to complete and change the understanding of any situation you are put it and self relate thus improving the situation.

"No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible." -Voltaire


Joey Ying
Studying Clinical Psychology/ Autism at CUNY Queens College
19
reblogged 18 hours ago
01
Aug
standwithpalestine:

A boy writes the names of Palestinian children killed by Israel since the start of their latest assault on Gaza, during a demonstration in Aida Refugee Camp near Bethlehem. (Photo: Musa Al-Shaer via SMPalestine)

standwithpalestine:

A boy writes the names of Palestinian children killed by Israel since the start of their latest assault on Gaza, during a demonstration in Aida Refugee Camp near Bethlehem. (Photo: Musa Al-Shaer via SMPalestine)

via/source ♥ 1,867 notes
reblogged 18 hours ago
01
Aug
palestinianpapi:

Born in a genocide and died in a genocide. Rest in power albi. There are no words for this. Justice will prevail.

palestinianpapi:

Born in a genocide and died in a genocide. Rest in power albi. There are no words for this. Justice will prevail.

via/source ♥ 3,586 notes
reblogged 18 hours ago
31
Jul

brazilia:

#GazaUnderAttack

via/source ♥ 330 notes
reblogged 18 hours ago
31
Jul

ghdos:

invisiblelad:

evolutia:

swallowthatshit:

gang0fwolves:

wussut:

sizvideos:

4 Year Old Foils Babysitter’s Robbery Plot - Video

Let’s just blame the black guy…

believe a little girl in 30 seconds but won’t believe the black man after 5 hours….lol ok.

Says a lot.

It really does. I think it’s wonderful that she told that truth however, this is a prime example of white privilege. At 4 years old, she actually had systematic power over the fate of a Black male. White privilege is a very real and impactful thing.

I know that this story is heartwarming in it’s own way. Yes, the 4 year old has more in the way of ethical fiber in her pinky than her babysitter has in her whole body. Yes, it’s case closed on a wrongfully accused case that could have had very serious consequences for the neighbor involved…

but there’s something really chilling about an otherwise law abiding citizen being arrested and questioned in handcuffs for 5 hours on the casual implication of a 17 year old. 

Shit like this angers me.

via/source ♥ 40,022 notes
reblogged 18 hours ago
31
Jul
blackgirlsrpretty2:

daggerpen:

gabzilla-z:

hylianears:

but they kept the servents black alright this is one of the ugliest things i’ve ever seen in my life



I am not sure I have ever seen a better use of that reaction gif.

wow! i didn’t even pay that any attention the first time! wow!

blackgirlsrpretty2:

daggerpen:

gabzilla-z:

hylianears:

but they kept the servents black alright this is one of the ugliest things i’ve ever seen in my life

image

I am not sure I have ever seen a better use of that reaction gif.

wow! i didn’t even pay that any attention the first time! wow!

via/source ♥ 34,732 notes
reblogged 18 hours ago
31
Jul

standwithpalestine:

La Paz (AFP) - Bolivia on Wednesday renounced a visa exemption agreement with Israel in protest over its offensive in Gaza, and declared it a terrorist state.

President Evo Morales announced the move during a talk with a group of educators in the city of Cochabamba.

It “means, in other words, we are declaring (Israel) a terrorist state,” he said.

The treaty has allowed Israelis to travel freely to Bolivia without a visa since 1972.

Morales said the Gaza offensive shows “that Israel is not a guarantor of the principles of respect for life and the elementary precepts of rights that govern the peaceful and harmonious coexistence of our international community.”

More than two weeks of fighting in Gaza have left 1,300 dead and 6,000 wounded amid an intense Israeli air and ground campaign in response to missile attacks by the Islamist militant group Hamas.

In the latest development, 20 people were killed after two Israeli shells slammed into a United Nations school, drawing international protests.

Bolivia broke off diplomatic relations with Israel in 2009 over a previous military operation in Gaza.

In mid-July, Morales filed a request with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to prosecute Israel for “crimes against humanity.”

Photos: Bolivian ambassador to the UN Sacha Llorenti wears keffiyeh in solidarity with Palestinians, July 2014. 

via/source ♥ 9,772 notes
reblogged 18 hours ago
31
Jul

captainlucifer:

in the hallway today there was a hispanic girl making white people jokes and these two white guys actually fucking said “that’s racist. what if we were saying stuff like that about mexican people?”

and she just gave them this dry look and said “i’m puerto rican.”

via/source ♥ 38,886 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul

thepoliticalfreakshow:

More than three weeks after Israel launched its latest assault on the Gaza Strip, and with no durable truce on the horizon, the situation in Israel/Palestine has descended into new and uncharted horrors. What began as a brute incursion by Israel, accompanied by a hail of Hamas rockets, has exploded into something shockingly worse: a bloodletting that, as The Nation went to press, had killed more than 1,200 Palestinians and fifty-six Israelis and pummeled Gaza into a landscape of human despair. Meanwhile in the West Bank, where thousands of Palestinians have poured into the streets for the largest protests in years, Israeli soldiers have responded with live ammunition; ten Palestinians were killed in a four-day period. And in Israel, where an empowered far right is ascendant, nationalist mobs have attacked Palestinian and Jewish antiwar protesters on several occasions.

The widening gyre of violence is terrible news for the entire region, but for none more than the 1.8 million Palestinians trapped in the battered sliver of the Gaza Strip. There, the “precision” bombs of the Israeli military have obliterated entire families of twenty and thirty; young boys have been blown apart while playing soccer on a beach; and whole neighborhoods have been leveled by the overwhelming Israeli firepower. The United Nations has estimated that as many as 74 percent of the Palestinians killed in Gaza have been civilians, with an average of one child dying every hour during one particularly bloody two-day stretch. With the borders closed and even UN schools under attack, there is simply no place for Palestinians to flee to.

“They told us it was safe,” Hussein Shinbari told Nation contributor Sharif Abdel Kouddous after the UN school in Beit Hanoun, where Shinbari’s family had taken shelter, was struck by a blast that killed sixteen people. (Israel has denied responsibility for the fatal strike.) Shinbari was the only one of his family who survived.

In the face of such horrors, the world’s increasingly alarmed top diplomats have taken to hopscotching the globe, hoping to patch together a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas, as they have during the past two Gaza conflicts, in 2008–09 and 2012. “In the name of humanity, the violence must stop,” UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon implored on July 28. Yet with nothing but a string of failures to show for their efforts—most notably, a proposal hammered out by Secretary of State John Kerry for a seven-day trial truce, during which both sides could work out a permanent one—the situation in Gaza continues to unravel.

“We must be prepared for a prolonged campaign,” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced just days after rejecting the Kerry effort.

There are any number of reasons these overtures have failed, leaving Kerry and his international cast of diplomats flailing in the wings. Certainly the leaders of both Israel and Hamas are dug in—caught in fantasies of regime change, collective punishment and security, in the case of Israel; survival, resistance and revenge, in the case of Hamas. That the countries negotiating on their behalf barely get along themselves has not helped matters. As The New York Timessummarized: “The United States does not deal directly with Hamas. And the countries with the closest ties, Qatar and Turkey, have fraught relations with Egypt, whose cease-fire plan has provided the broad framework for Mr. Kerry’s efforts.”

Just as debilitating has been the skewed nature of the cease-fire process itself: the attempt to frame a flagrantly asymmetrical conflict between occupier and occupied as a fight between equals, and, further, to place a highly biased superpower in the position of lead broker. Even now, as Israel has deployed its powerful military to flatten parts of Gaza, American leaders, from the president to Congress, have lined up to affirm Israel’s “right to self-defense.” And in a blunt display of support for impunity, the United States provided the sole opposing vote on a UN Human Rights Commission resolution to investigate violations of international law—including possible war crimes— committed in the occupied Palestinian territories during the present onslaught.

Recently there have been signs of a shift, however fractional, at the highest levels, as Kerry and, to a lesser degree, President Obama have expressed frustration with Israel’s shattering disregard for Palestinian lives. “Palestinians need to live with dignity, with some freedom, with goods that can come in and out,” Kerry said in a statement that presaged the draft cease-fire he submitted on July 25. That draft enraged Israeli leaders, who refuse to even contemplate lifting the seven-year siege of Gaza. But as Kerry flew home with the tailwinds of defeat at his back, it was clear that the United States is a long way from using the most powerful arrows in its quiver: the threat of withdrawing all or part of its annual $3 billion in military aid to Israel.

The failure of the cease-fire proposals have left a void where impunity continues to flourish. Yet the diverse and humane currents of international civil society have been responding, issuing demands Washington is too timid to make. This includes the sixty-four Nobel laureates and public figures—among them Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Noam Chomsky—who have called for an international arms embargo on Israel. They include legal experts like John Dugard, Noura Erakat and Peter Weiss, who have demanded an end to Israel’s collective punishment in Gaza and the beginning of “procedures to hold accountable all those responsible for violations of international law.” They include Jewish groups like Jewish Voice for Peace, which has been tireless in defending Palestinian rights, and J Street, which is pressing for an end to the siege of Gaza. And they include the Palestinian civil society groups that have been steadfast in calling for nonviolent resistance by means of boycott, divestment and sanctions.

Together these actors are sketching out a blueprint, at once necessary and aspirational, to end the crisis. Although they may not agree on every point, their calls form the outline of a just resolution: an immediate end to Israel’s siege and bombing of Gaza; cease-fire monitors to hold the parties accountable; investigations into war crimes committed by Israel and Hamas; and an end to the great sin of the occupation.

All of these recommendations face massive obstacles, and they will never happen until Israel, the United States and Hamas are pushed to enact them. But as the cycle of impunity continues, the demands of civil society are the Palestinians’—and Israelis’—best hope.

Source: The Editors of The Nation

via/source ♥ 26 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul

thepoliticalfreakshow:

A Palestinian man holds a girl injured in an Israeli shelling at a UN-run school sheltering Palestinian refugees. (Reuters, Finbarr O’Reilly)

Khan Younis and Beit Lahia, Gaza—Hussein Shinbari is the only member of his family that survived the attack on a United Nations school in Beit Hanoun on Thursday. He is covered in blood. His undershirt, his pants and his hands are all stained a deep red.

After Israel launched its ground invasion into Gaza last week, the Shinbari family left their home in the northeastern town close to the Israeli border and sought shelter at the nearby school. “They told us it was safe,” Hussein says, sitting on the ground by the morgue of the Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia.

More than 1,500 displaced Palestinians were staying at the school. The conflict has caused unprecedented massive displacement in Gaza, forcing over 140,000 people to seek shelter in more than eighty UN shelters.

On Thursday afternoon, the people in the Beit Hanoun school were told they were being transferred to another area, away from the shelling and clashes on the streets outside. According to multiple survivors, they were instructed to gather their scant belongings and assemble in the schoolyard to await buses that would take them to another shelter.

At around 2:30 pm a barrage of artillery shells crashed into the school, according to witnesses. At least sixteen people were killed and more than 200 wounded, many of them women and children. Hussein lost his mother; his stepmother; his 16-year-old brother, Abel Rabo; his 12-year-old sister, Maria; and his 9-year-old brother, Ali.

“I was the only one who walked out,” Hussein says. He helped carry his dying family members to the ambulances that eventually arrived. “I’m not asking Hamas or Fatah for anything,” he says. “I only have God left.”

The Israeli military says Hamas was firing rockets from Beit Hanoun and that it had told the Palestinian refugee agency, UNRWA, and the Red Cross to evacuate the school. Yet UNRWA spokesman Chris Gunness says the UN had asked the Israeli military for a lull in the fighting to allow for an evacuation but did not hear back. Gunness says precise coordinates of the shelter had been formally given to the Israeli army. The attack marked the fourth time a UN facility has been hit by Israel since the conflict began on July 8.

“These people had no place to go. They are very poor, so they sought the protection of the United Nations,” says Dr. Bassam al-Masry, the head of the orthopedic department at the Kamal Adwan Hospital, whose house is adjacent to the school in Beit Hanoun. “Today they were shelled. Why?”

The hospital is filled with heart-wrenching scenes. Men and women being carried in on stretchers. People rushing through the halls with wounded children in their arms. It is unbearably hot and humid. In one corner, six women gather in a knot of grief, sobbing and holding each other. One of them collapses in shock.

Inside the morgue a baby is brought onto the wooden examination table. She is about 1 year old. She looks unharmed, except when her head is turned to reveal that a small chunk of her neck is missing. The other bodies lie in the refrigerated morgue drawers cocooned in bloodied white shrouds. Only their faces are uncovered.

“We thought the school was safer than our house,” says 32-year-old Monther Hamdan. He is lying on a cot with a wounded leg and grasps his father’s hand as he speaks. All thirteen members of his family were injured in the attack. They arrived at the school three days ago. “The tank shells fell like rain.”

The attack on the UN school came on one of the bloodiest days of the conflict. Approximately 120 Palestinians were killed yesterday, bringing the death toll in Gaza to nearly 800, the vast majority of them civilians, including at least 190 children, according to the Health Ministry. Over a two-day period, a child was killed every hour in Gaza. More than 5,100 have been wounded.

The level of violence has escalated significantly since Israel’s ground invasion last week. Calls for a cease-fire seem to have had the opposite effect. A three-kilometer buffer zone has been declared by Israeli military, equivalent to 44 percent of the Gaza Strip. Israeli forces have pushed in from the border backed by tanks and a continued assault from the air. Thirty-two Israeli soldiers and three civilians have been killed.

In southern Gaza, the Israeli military dropped leaflets warning residents to evacuate areas east of Khan Younis. “The Israeli Defense Forces are not targeting any of you,” it says. “If you follow directions, the IDF will not hurt any of you, the civilian population.”

Testimonies by the residents of the town of Khuzaa, one of the Palestinian residential areas closest to Israel, belie that claim. They describe a nightmarish ordeal trying to escape the Israeli invasion. Multiple witnesses say they were prevented from getting out by Israeli tanks and troops, that Israeli forces fired on ambulances and that the dead and wounded were left behind in the streets.

“There was no mercy,” says Wael Abu Irgala, a 24-year-old resident of Khuzaa. “We saw things you couldn’t imagine.”

Wael says the Israeli military began indiscriminately shelling Khuzaa on Tuesday at around sunset. By 1 am, Israeli troops began knocking on doors and shouting out taunts to the residents inside, calling for the men of the houses to come and face them, says Wael’s aunt Asmaa. The next morning Wael and Asmaa and hundreds of the town’s residents tried to evacuate, but it would be another twenty-four hellish hours before they made it out.

Town residents gathered on Wednesday morning and held up white flags as they walked. Two handicapped girls were being pushed in wheelchairs. Without warning, an Israeli tank stationed on the main road opened fire, shooting bullets into the crowd. The residents fled in panic. The man pushing one of the wheelchairs was shot, leaving the handicapped girl alone on the street.

“There were wounded on the ground and we couldn’t save them,” Wael says. “They would shoot anything that moved.”

Many people were injured in the attack and a number sought refuge at the house of a local doctor, Kamal Gedeih. He tended to the injured with very basic first aid supplies, including Wael’s other aunt, who was shot in the stomach.

Multiple calls were made to local hospitals, human rights organizations and the Red Cross, pleading for help in escaping the conflict, but no one came.

In the afternoon, an airstrike hit the yard of Gedieh’s house where the doctor’s brother was filling up water bottles for the people inside. It took him ten minutes to die. Another fifteen minutes later, a shell smashed into the side of the building. Gedieh himself was injured along with several others.

Wael and Asmaa decided to leave the doctor’s house and took their wounded relative, who was shot in the stomach, and other family members with them. They ended up finding a basement where dozens of other residents were seeking shelter. They spent the night there. There was no water, food or electricity. Several people collapsed from exhaustion.

The shelling and bombardment continued throughout the night. On Thursday morning, they decided to try and make their way out again. They walked in a group with their hands in the air. Some carried white flags.

“We didn’t expect to get out alive,” says Asmaa. “We walked for five kilometers waiting for death.” She says Israeli troops on tanks and deployed in the streets were blocking all the main roads. They gestured which direction for them to go. The relative with the stomach wound had to be half-carried the entire way.

In the assault, the town had been demolished. “We found a burning land, we didn’t know the streets or the houses of our own neighborhood,” Asmaa says. “It looked like a different world, empty of people.”

They finally made it out to Nasser hospital in Khan Younis late Thursday morning.

The scene at the hospital is one of chaos and overcrowding. People fill the corridors. The wounded are ferried back and forth. One man follows two corpses being carried into the morgue. He is holding a bright blue plastic bag. In it is all that remains of one of his relatives.

“This was the worst night in this hospital,” says Dr. Jamal al-Hams, the director general of the hospital. He says at least twenty-one people are dead and 150 injured. “The fridges are full and there’s nowhere to put the bodies.”

Multiple medical workers and witnesses say the Israeli military did not allow ambulances to enter Khuzaa during the brutal assault.

“There are many wounded still inside. They are calling us and we can’t get to them,” says Dr. Wissam Nabhan at the European Hospital in eastern Khan Younis. Nabhan says he took four ambulance trips on Thursday morning to try to evacuate people, and every time he came under fire from the Israeli military.

“This was a massacre of the people of Khuzaa.”

Source: Sharif Abdel Kouddous for The Nation

via/source ♥ 10 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul
fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian man photographs a fire in Gaza’s main power plant following an overnight Israeli airstrike south of Gaza City on July 29, 2014. Gaza’s only power plant destroyed in Israel’s most intense air strike yet — at least 100 Palestinians killed and media outlets, mosque and refugee camp all targeted (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian man photographs a fire in Gaza’s main power plant following an overnight Israeli airstrike south of Gaza City on July 29, 2014. Gaza’s only power plant destroyed in Israel’s most intense air strike yet — at least 100 Palestinians killed and media outlets, mosque and refugee camp all targeted (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

via/source ♥ 327 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul
rtamerica:

White House accidentally leaks post-9/11 CIA torture report findings
When the CIA first began using its controversial interrogation and detention methods after the September 11th attacks, it reportedly declined to tell the Secretary of State and other American ambassadors about its actions.
The revelation comes from the Senate’s still-unreleased report scrutinizing the United States’ post-9/11 interrogation techniques, and first came to the public’s attention Wednesday when the White House unintentionally emailed a document detailing the findings to an Associated Press reporter.
The report – parts of which could be declassified by the White House in the coming days – also apparently found that some of the ambassadors who were briefed on the CIA’s activity were told not to notify their superiors in the State Department. One congressional official confirmed to the AP that these findings are documented in the Senate’s report, while a former CIA official said then-Secretary of State Colin Powell may not have known about the agency’s techniques when they first started using them.

rtamerica:

White House accidentally leaks post-9/11 CIA torture report findings

When the CIA first began using its controversial interrogation and detention methods after the September 11th attacks, it reportedly declined to tell the Secretary of State and other American ambassadors about its actions.

The revelation comes from the Senate’s still-unreleased report scrutinizing the United States’ post-9/11 interrogation techniques, and first came to the public’s attention Wednesday when the White House unintentionally emailed a document detailing the findings to an Associated Press reporter.

The report – parts of which could be declassified by the White House in the coming days – also apparently found that some of the ambassadors who were briefed on the CIA’s activity were told not to notify their superiors in the State Department. One congressional official confirmed to the AP that these findings are documented in the Senate’s report, while a former CIA official said then-Secretary of State Colin Powell may not have known about the agency’s techniques when they first started using them.

via/source ♥ 161 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul
via/source ♥ 57 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul

thepoliticalfreakshow:

The news: Israeli units attacked Gaza’s only power station, burning large sections of it to the ground. It made for a dramatic picture in Gaza, one that some on social media said looked like actual hell on Earth.

The bombing appears to have cut off both electricity and water sanitation for most of the Palestinian territory’s 1.8 million residents. According to the Washington Post, the damage will take months to repair and has left almost all of Gaza, including some hospitals, without utility access. Six of eight remaining power connections from Israel have been severed by the fighting.

But that’s not all. Later, an Israeli tank attack on a UN school killed at least 15 Palestinians, even though Gaza residents were told to seek safety there. Israel accuses Hamas of using schools as bases to launch rockets.

Here’s what you need to know: The death toll in the Gaza Strip soared past 1,200 Tuesday, with whole neighborhoods reduced to rubble as constant bombing killed as many as 100 Palestinians. As Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that the Israel Defence Force’s campaign in Gaza would be “prolonged,” hinting that the Israeli invasion has taken on new objectives, Gazans cowered in fear from some of the most intense bombings yet seen in the area. 

The United Nations estimates that 70-80% of the dead are civilians. An additional 7,000 have been wounded. In short, the situation in Gaza is getting much worse very quickly.

Dozens of other attacks ravaged whole neighborhoods, with ferocious strikes targeting senior Hamas political leader Ismail Haniyeh’s residence, Hamas’ al-Aqsa TV headquarters, a finance building and several local mayors’ homes. Gaza City’s al-Amin Mohammed Mosque, which sits across the street from a house owned by Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, was blown apart. Hamas and Israel blamed each other for shells which exploded in Jabaliya refugee camp, killing at least 10 people.

Bombs also fell near areas where international journalists were housed.

time lapse video appears to show an entire Gaza neighborhood totally annihilated after an hour of sustained airstrikes.

On the Israeli side, the threat of rockets sent some in Tel Aviv scrambling for bomb shelters. Bands of Hamas militants are somehow still finding their way through tunnels leading under the border. Five Israeli soldiers were killed in gun battles with one such infiltration force, bringing the total number of soldiers dead to 53. The IDF’s official propaganda channel has turned up the rhetoric, offering prayers to slain heroes and providing daily updates on the number of targets bombed.

Meanwhile, Hamas distributed some chilling propaganda of its own: A video of the tunnel attack, which appears to show the deaths of some of the five soldiers killed.

A ceasefire has so far failed to develop, with both Hamas and Israel blaming each other.

Why you should care: While the rest of the world appears pretty shocked by the images coming out of Gaza, most Israelis either aren’t shocked or accept them as the cost of dismantling Hamas. The Washington Post reports between 87% and 95% of Israeli Jews generally support continuing the operation, while four out of five oppose a unilateral withdrawal. Hamas’ merry band of fanatics remains obstinate despite horrifying losses in manpower and resources. As of now there doesn’t seem to be a short-term impetus for either side to change the course of the ongoing conflict, which means continued devastation of this scale is sadly likely.

Source: Tom McKay for World.Mic

via/source ♥ 3,434 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul
teavibes:

msannthropic:

death-limes:

venipede:

osteophagy:

endcetaceanexploitation:

Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language.
One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation:
"People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing "MY BABY DIED." Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed "CRY", touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences." [23]
Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age.

more about Washoe:
after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.”
the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him.
*information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson.

Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could.

now if y’all don’t think this is the tightest shit you can get outta my face

reblog for the commentary

The captains omg

teavibes:

msannthropic:

death-limes:

venipede:

osteophagy:

endcetaceanexploitation:

Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language.

One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation:

"People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing "MY BABY DIED." Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed "CRY", touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences." [23]

Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age.

more about Washoe:

after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.”

the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him.

*information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson.

Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could.

now if y’all don’t think this is the tightest shit you can get outta my face

reblog for the commentary

The captains omg

via/source ♥ 228,211 notes
reblogged 1 day ago
31
Jul

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Over the weekend, a 17-year-old girl attending a rowdy Keith Urban concert outside of Boston broke away from her friends with a man she’d just met. Minutes later, the man was sexually assaulting her out in the open as more than a dozen passersby watched, with some even taking cell phone videos.

The girl met 18-year-old Sean Murphy at the concert, and after the two began kissing, he led her away. According to multiple outlets, what happened after that sounds like a shitshow nightmare.

As the two began having sex, a small crowd gathered around to watch, some patrons really classing up the joint by taking pictures and video with their phones. When a female bystander asked the girl “do you want this?”, she said “no,” and according to witnesses, broke free from Murphy and ran away. The girl found her friends, who took her to the police. The police, in turn, locked all the concert attendees inside the outdoor amphitheater as they searched for Murphy, who witnesses say was on his cell phone with his parents, telling them that he had “messed up.” According to the police report, he was drunk on Jack Daniels, like the alcohol is some sort of magical rape tonic that turns normal dudes into rapists. The last time I drank Jack Daniels, I had a headache the next day. Did zero raping.

Murphy’s attorneys say the act was consensual and “regrettably public.”

Even without the sexual assault, Urban’s concert was already a certified clusterfuck, as 50 attendees were arrested for over imbibing and 46 were treated for “alcohol related illnesses.”

Source: Erin Gloria Ryan for Jezebel

UPDATE (7/31/2014 12:36 AM): Below is more information about the rape, and a picture of the rapist, 18-year-old Sean Murphy, who was arrested & charged with sexual assault, courtesy of Global Grind

Sean-Murphy-300x247

A Boston man has been arrested after allegedly raping a 17-year-old girl in front of concertgoers at a Keith Urban country music show in Mansfield, Mass. this weekend.

Sean Murphy, 18, was charged with sexual assault after raping the teenager in front of fans who told authorities they didn’t realize what they were witnessing.

From CBS:

The incident began when a witness approached an officer to report a possible rape on the front lawn of the venue, according to a Mansfield Police statement. According to a police report, a witness told an officer she approached the female who was on the ground and asked her if the “event” was consensual. She allegedly told the witness “no.”

Then the witness, “saw the female break free and run.” Police, in their statement, said a witness pushed the suspect off of the victim. The suspect then fled into the crowd.

Patrons brought the victim to get help and reunite her with her friends, according to the police statement.

After receiving a description of the suspect from witnesses, police closed the venue’s gates and searched for Murphy. He was found, arrested and taken into custody.

Witnesses say more than a dozen people looked-on, taking photos. Police are processing those photos as evidence, according to their Facebook post.

Murphy told police it was consensual. According to the police report, Murphy “stressed that he did not force himself on her.”

The rape occurred on the same day that dozens of concertgoers at the show were arrested or treated for alcohol consumption and poisoning.

SOURCE: CBS | PHOTO CREDIT: Mansfield Police

This post will be updated when necessary & when new updates are available. 

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