Change how you think.

Your awesome Tagline

55,720 notes

zeramato:

Students who still have a lot ahead of them. Students like me, who still have dreams, goals, and students who still aim for achievements. But because of this tragedy, it all faded away. 

I bow and salute to the brave students who saved the lives of others and sacrificed themselves. They are heroes. They are people who deserves a lot better than awards. They deserve to be in Heaven, a place full of happiness and there will be no more sufferings. I also pray for the lives of the family and the people involved in this accident and specially the souls of these heroes.

I hope that the students who were saved by these mighty students will live their lives to the fullest, achieve their dreams and goals and love their family more. I also wish that they will live being inspired by the heroes who saved their lives. Please do so.

And for the captain, my middle finger salutes you. Live well. In guilt. Thank you.

#PrayForSouthKorea

(via pearliest)

20 notes

FCC: Create a "Sexual Violence" Warning for Television Shows

thepoliticalfreakshow:

FCC: Create a "Sexual Violence" Warning for Television Shows

***Warning*** This petition text contains references to sexual violence.

Right now, millions of sexual violence survivors are at risk for re-traumatization from the television programs they watch. But there’s one easy thing the FCC can do to stop that — create a “sexual violence” content warning for television. 

I was recently watching the new TV series Bates Motel, and was surprised to see a very graphic rape scene half-way through the episode. The title of the program and the information listed for the episode did not include information about a rape scene, nor was there a content warning specific to sexual violence at the beginning of the show. And it’s not just Bates Motel — in the past year graphic scenes of sexual violence have appeared in The Walking Dead, Girls, Silent Witness, Game of Thrones, and other programs.

The picture you are seeing is of myself and my co-workers, friends and fellow survivors, Anna Perez and Christine Kobie. As survivors and advocates we understand how damaging this content can be to someone who is not expecting it and is not able to prepare for it. Survivors’ memories of their own assault can be triggered by sights, sounds, smells or even feelings that they experience. These triggers can bring back memories of the trauma and cause intense emotional reactions and physical reactions, especially in survivors with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Millions of television viewers are sexual violence survivors. According to RAINN statistics, 1 in 6 women and 1 in 33 men have been sexually assaulted in their lifetime. That means that of the audience for the episode of Bates Motel which featured a rape scene, there were potentially over 450,000 survivors in the audience (assuming that out of the 4.6 million viewers, half were women and half were men). These survivors deserved a warning.

Fortunately, there’s an easy solution — The FCC, via the TV Parental Guidelines, should create a “sexual violence” content warning at the beginning of any television show that will be airing an episode with sexual violence.

Such a warning will empower survivors by giving them the choice on whether or not they want to watch, and if they do, they can prepare themselves for the scene. It will also allow families to decide what type of violent content they want to view. The FCC has already designated “fantasy violence” as a subset of violent content that affects viewers differently than other forms of violence, they need to do the same for sexual violence.

Please join us in asking the FCC to create a “sexual violence” content warning, including a resource for survivors like the RAINN 24-Hour Hotline (800) 656-HOPE, to be shown before programs with scenes of sexual violence.

To: 
Federal Communications Commission and TV Parental Guidelines 
TV Parental Guidlines 
Tammy Sun, Director Media Relations, FCC 
Julius Genachowski, Chairman, FCC 
Robert McDowell, Comissioner, FCC 
Mignon Clyburn, Comissioner, FCC 
Jessica Rosenworcel, Comissioner, FCC 
Ajit Pai, Comissioner, FCC 
Create a “Sexual Violence” Warning for television

Sincerely, 
[Your name]

42 notes

thinksquad:

General Mills: If you “engage” with one of our brands online including ‘like’ us on facebook , or using dowloaded coupons, you “enter a contract with the company, waiving all rights to future lawsuits.”
Food companies are increasingly facing more class-action lawsuits over labeling and ingredients. Last year, General Mills shelled out $8.5 million to settle a suit over how it labeled its Yoplait Yo-Plus yogurt. In 2012, two women sued the company over claims its Nature Valley products were 100% natural, alleging highly processed ingredients were used. That same year, it settled another suit over Strawberry Fruit Roll-Ups, agreeing to remove the word “strawberry” from its packaging.
http://money.msn.com/top-stocks/post—general-mills-if-you-like-us-dont-sue-us

thinksquad:

General Mills: If you “engage” with one of our brands online including ‘like’ us on facebook , or using dowloaded coupons, you “enter a contract with the company, waiving all rights to future lawsuits.”

Food companies are increasingly facing more class-action lawsuits over labeling and ingredients. Last year, General Mills shelled out $8.5 million to settle a suit over how it labeled its Yoplait Yo-Plus yogurt. In 2012, two women sued the company over claims its Nature Valley products were 100% natural, alleging highly processed ingredients were used. That same year, it settled another suit over Strawberry Fruit Roll-Ups, agreeing to remove the word “strawberry” from its packaging.

http://money.msn.com/top-stocks/post—general-mills-if-you-like-us-dont-sue-us

47 notes

The KKK Is a Terrorist Organization, So Why Are The News Media Scared To Call The Kansas Jewish Community Center Shooter A Terrorist?

thepoliticalfreakshow:

This weekend, three people were killed in violent incidents outside Kansas City. From the earliest reports, the killings bore all the hallmarks of a terrorist attack.

There is still no consensus over the definition, but terrorism usually denotes a nonstate actor attacking civilian targets to spread fear for some putative political goal. And here we had a 73-year-old lone wolf opening fire on a Jewish community center and retirement home on Passover eve yelling “Heil Hitler.”

With time, it’s become even clearer that the alleged perpetrator is a terrorist. As founder of the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Patriot Party, Frazier Glenn Miller has a long history of militant anti-Semitism. The Southern Poverty Law Center described him as a “raging anti-Semite” known for posting online rants, like “No Jews, Just Right.” The Institute for Research & Education on Human Rights has also noted, “His worship for Hitler and Hitlerism is real.” According to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, Miller is “one of the pioneers in the modern hate world, he’s been entrenched in the hate movement his entire adult life.”

And yet, the word terrorism wasn’t mentioned “in a single bit of news coverage,” as one observer noted. Why?

For starters, the local police were at first reluctant to acknowledge the apparent political motive — namely, anti-Semitism. To their credit, they have subsequently described the shootings as a possible “hate crime.” These are acts of violence committed on the basis of race, religion, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation or disability. And like terrorism, they are meant to terrorize a third party beyond the immediate victims themselves — in this case, the broader American Jewry.

But what does it take for a hateful act to become a full-fledged terrorist attack? You might think the distinction hinges on lethality. A year ago this week, though, the Boston Marathon bombings killed the same number of bystanders, and Americans had little trouble fingering the incident as terrorism. And over the years, the Klan has killed many more Americans than has Al Qaeda, and the group has certainly fanned its share of fear.

To continue reading this article, click here.

6 notes

Site Glitch Reveals Who Nominated Themselves For Pulitzer Prize

thepoliticalfreakshow:

As part of its secretive judging process, the Pulitzer Prize committee closely guards the names of outlets and reporters who submit their work for consideration. But a loophole in the Prize’s online submission website inadvertently revealed that BuzzFeed and The Daily Beast sought butdid not win journalism’s highest honor.

password retrieval form on Pulitzer.org currently identifies whether someone has registered an account under a particular username or email address. Most usernames and email addresses, when entered, return a “not recognized” notification. Entering the usernames “buzzfeed,” “thedailybeast,” and “pando,” however, returned messages indicating that “further instructions have been sent to your e-mail address.”

BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith confirmed the finding in an email to Gawker, but refused to identify which stories the website submitted for consideration. The Daily Beast also entered the Pulitzer contest, a Beast staffer familiar with the process said, but under a different username; “thedailybeast” apparently was used in prior submission cycles.

Pando’s editorial director, Paul Carr, said the “pando” username belonged to someone else. “We didn’t nominate anything for a Pulitzer. Maybe there’s a Mr. P Ando working somewhere.”

Both BuzzFeed and The Daily Beast publish aggressive political reporting and frequent dispatches from conflict zones across the globe. Ben Smith told the Hollywood Reporter on Wednesday that BuzzFeed’s content had successfully expanded beyond listicles like “The 33 Most Jizz-Worthy Moments In Ryan Gosling’s 33 Years On Earth” into on-the-ground coverage of Ukraine.

Indeed, BuzzFeed hasn’t exactly concealed its Pulitzer ambitions. The website’s top editors haveaggressively recruited prize-winning reporters to staff its nascent investigations team, headed by Pulitzer winner and former ProPublica editor Mark Schoofs. The site’s latest hire, Chris Hamby,was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting on Monday.

To contact the author of this post, email trotter@gawker.com

Source: J.K. Trotter for Gawker

81 notes

Watch Hillary Clinton tell an undocumented 19-year-old why she supports immigration reform

thepoliticalfreakshow:

A 19-year-old undocumented immigrant confronted Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and not-quite-presidential candidate, about immigration reform at an event hosted by the Clinton Foundation Thursday.

An hour into the panel discussion, which featured Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea Clinton, the moderator, actress America Ferrera, called on a young woman at the front of the room to ask a question. “I have a very different glass ceiling than some of the girls here,” the 19-year-old woman explained, fighting back tears. “For the first time publicly I want to say that I am an undocumented immigrant.” She went on to explain that her family had illegally brought her to the US from Croatia when she was five-years-old. “It’s been very hard,” she continued, “because I don’t have the documentation to get a job, to vote—which is essential obviously to women representation—to buy an apartment, to take out a loan to go to college, so I couldn’t even go to my dream college because of that, to get no financial aid.”

Clinton immediately sympathized. “I believe strongly that we are missing a great opportunity by not welcoming people like you,” she said, “and 11 million others who have made contributions to our country, into a legal status.”

You can watch the exchange here, beginning at the hour and 20-minute mark.

Clinton continued, saying that she favors “immigration reform and a path to citizenship.” The former secretary of state shied away from offering an opinion on how exactly she thinks the government should offer citizenship to those residing in the country without documents, but she endorsed the reform bill that the Senate passed last year. Without naming the party, she called out the Republican leaders of the House of Representatives and said that they should allow a vote on the bill. “I think that’s a big missed opportunity for our country,” Clinton said, “because part of the reason we’re going to do really well in the 21st century is because we are a nation of immigrants. We keep attracting people like you and your family who want to make a contribution. It’s not only because we want to make life better for people like yourselves who is already here, it’s good for us.”

The Clintons were speaking at an event for the family foundation’s No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project, which focuses on advancing women’s rights worldwide. The younger Clinton made news herself at the event by announcing that she is pregnant.

Clinton supported the failed bipartisan efforts to reform the immigration system during George W Bush’s second term. The Senate’s latest stab at fixing the system is more modest than the Bush-era proposal.

Source: Patrick Caldwell for Mother Jones

5 notes

The 9/11 Trial Has Gone Completely Off the Rails

thepoliticalfreakshow:

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVY BASE, CUBA—We have a problem at Gitmo. It’s time for Judge James Pohl, the army colonel in charge of the 9/11 trial, to reassess the process. 

Six sprawling legal teams, one judge, ten victims’ family members, ten reporters and many more observers travelled to Cuba this week to settle a primary question everyone already agreed upon: Whether Ramzi bin al Shibh, one of the lesser 9/11 defendants, was fit to stand trial. They never got to it. In fact, they somehow ended the week further from a trial than they started. 

In previous hearings, Al Shibh interrupted the proceedings with complaints of strange noises and vibrations in his cell, but his defense lawyers say he’s fit for trial. The prosecutor, Army Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, agrees, and the legal system presumes competence unless proven otherwise. But Martins insisted that Judge Pohl hear arguments anyway, presumably so the matter is not used against him in any future appeals. (Despite their agreement on the result, the lawyers argued incessantly about procedural technicalities.) 

Judge Pohl eventually decided it was just too ridiculous. He refused to hear full arguments, and ruled the presumption of competency stands.

If this were just a fluke week, we could end there. If we could just catch up next week, then no big deal. But Al Shibh and the other 9/11 suspects’ trial is totally off the rails. The next hearing won’t come until June. The last one was in December.

Step back, and it gets worse. When alleged September 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four others were arraigned here in May 2012, their trial appeared at least a year or two away. Two years later, it appears yet another year or two or more away. KSM has been in custody already for eleven years. The families of the victims of September 11 and the country deserve resolution. 

And yet resolution is nowhere in sight: The docket in Judge Pohl’s courtroom this week included nearly 20 additional issues to address once competency was established. We never got to them, either. 

Instead, Al Shibh’s defense team began the week by accusing the FBI of trying to enlist one of its members as an FBI informant—a development that caught everyone unaware. What we know for sure is that two FBI agents questioned a key member of one defense team. Depending upon the extent of the FBI’s investigation—still completely unclear, to everyone in the courtroom—it could raise serious conflicts of interest for the defense lawyers with their clients. Thursday, Judge Pohl announced that he had appointed a special prosecutor to investigate the extent and impact of what he called “The FBI issue.” 

Special prosecutors inevitably drag on and on—it’s hard to be thorough quickly. At the very least, it seems reasonable that the new investigation will consume the trial’s next session, slated for a single week in June. If that goes extremely smoothly—and it is very unlikely to go smoothly—the court will convene again in August. By then it will have been eight months since the last productive session last December. (The February session was cancelled.)

Iam new to this case. I don’t understand all the particulars, not by a country mile. And I get that it’s hard. There are a lot of thorny issues to untangle. The prosecution and defense teams each conducted press conferences after the recess, Thursday, and I asked them each: Is this working? Are there structural problems here? Is there a better way to do this?  

They gave a lot of reasons for the delays, particularly the defense. Al Shibh’s lawyer James Harrington said much of the investigative work had to be done in 17 countries overseas. “We have been to seven,” he said. James Connell, a lawyer for Ammar al Baluchi, enumerated the logistical hassles of getting to and working at Gitmo. (Anyone who’s made the trek one time can attest to that.)

There is also one massive looming issue, which Connell returned to all week: “The three or so years of my client’s life where he was under CIA custody.” He and other four defense teams contend that the U.S. government needs to come clean on exactly if, how, and when it tortured their clients—and then defense attorneys can begin the real process of building their cases. 

They may get their wish. In a stunning development, The Miami Herald reported this morning that Judge Pohl just ordered the CIA to release details about its black sites in the USS Cole bombing case, including names, dates and places.  The implications for the 9/11 case could be staggering. But the effects won’t likely be felt until the discovery process really gets going. Here were some suggestions from the lawyers, families and reporters on how to expedite the process:

  • Return to monthly sessions, as they were conducted briefly last fall.
  • Meet for two weeks at a time instead of one.
  • Limit the time the attorneys can devote to other cases.

Or more radically:

  • Move the proceedings to somewhere accessible.
  • Sequester everyone in one location for an extended period. (Perhaps a handful of extended periods.)
  • Sever the case into five separate trials. (A longshot, as it requires the defendants to agree. Now that they’ve experienced the gridlock, perhaps they will reconsider.) 

It’s up to you, Judge Pohl. Are you satisfied with this pace?

Source: Dave Cullen for New Republic

32 notes

thinksquad:

Start saving now: Day care costs more than college in 31 states
College costs loom large in the parental mind. According to a 2013 report by Sallie Mae, half of parents are putting away money for their kids’ education. Those who aren’t are fretting about it, saying that they feel “frustrated,” “overwhelmed” and “annoyed” when they think about college savings. But most parents will deal with an even larger kid-related expense long before college, and it’s a cost that very few of them are as prepared for. That expense is day care.
A report last fall by Child Care Aware America, a national organization of child-care resource and referral agencies, found that the annual cost of day care for an infant exceeds the average cost of in-state tuition and fees at public colleges in 31 states. The biggest gap is in New York, where day care will set you back nearly 15 grand, but in-state college tuition is only $6,500 — a difference of over $8,000. Massachusetts, Maryland, Colorado and Oregon also have large gaps, driven primarily by the high cost of day care in those states. At the other end of the spectrum is South Carolina, where in-state tuition is higher than the cost of day care by about $4,000 a year.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/04/09/start-saving-now-day-care-costs-more-than-college-in-31-states/?tid=sm_fb

thinksquad:

Start saving now: Day care costs more than college in 31 states

College costs loom large in the parental mind. According to a 2013 report by Sallie Mae, half of parents are putting away money for their kids’ education. Those who aren’t are fretting about it, saying that they feel “frustrated,” “overwhelmed” and “annoyed” when they think about college savings. But most parents will deal with an even larger kid-related expense long before college, and it’s a cost that very few of them are as prepared for. That expense is day care.

A report last fall by Child Care Aware America, a national organization of child-care resource and referral agencies, found that the annual cost of day care for an infant exceeds the average cost of in-state tuition and fees at public colleges in 31 states. The biggest gap is in New York, where day care will set you back nearly 15 grand, but in-state college tuition is only $6,500 — a difference of over $8,000. Massachusetts, Maryland, Colorado and Oregon also have large gaps, driven primarily by the high cost of day care in those states. At the other end of the spectrum is South Carolina, where in-state tuition is higher than the cost of day care by about $4,000 a year.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/04/09/start-saving-now-day-care-costs-more-than-college-in-31-states/?tid=sm_fb